Schools Want to Ban Phones. Parents Say No. | The Wall Street Journal

Schools Want to Ban Phones. Parents Say No. | The Wall Street Journal

Schools Want to Ban Phones. Parents Say No. | The Wall Street Journal

In Brush, Colorado, educators and parents fought over the pervasive presence of smartphones in schools. With devices becoming central to disciplinary issues—ranging from distractions in class to serious concerns like cyberbullying and privacy violations—teachers and administrators advocated for strict bans. However, parents pushed back, arguing they needed constant access to their children for both emergencies and everyday communication.

In response to the escalating tension, Brush School District implemented a compromise: students could keep their phones as long as they remained out of sight and inaccessible during school hours unless approved by a teacher. Despite this concession, some parents found the policy too restrictive and opted to transfer their children elsewhere.

The debate reflects a broader societal dilemma regarding the role of smartphones in education and adolescent life. While some argue for total bans to alleviate distractions and protect mental health, others advocate for teaching responsible usage instead of outright prohibition. Meanwhile, concerns about safety during emergencies, such as school shootings, add another layer of complexity to the issue.

Recent experiments, like the one conducted by Fort Wayne Community Schools in Indiana, aim to assess the impact of cellphone bans on classroom engagement and student behavior. By locking away phones during the school day, educators hope to create an environment conducive to learning while breaking the cycle of dependency on digital devices.

As schools grapple with these challenges, the conversation extends beyond mere policy implementation to shaping cultural norms around smartphone usage. The ultimate goal for many educators is to establish a habit of phone-free school days, starting from a young age, to foster healthier learning environments……….full-loaf-600x400-1-e1700879832480 Schools Want to Ban Phones. Parents Say No. | The Wall Street Journal[read more]

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Rising-Dough-e1700879911412 Schools Want to Ban Phones. Parents Say No. | The Wall Street JournalHow might the ongoing debate over smartphone usage in schools impact the future of education and the relationship between educators, parents, and technology companies?

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Cindy
23 days ago

The ongoing debate over smartphone usage in schools could have significant implications for the future of education. It may shape the way educators incorporate technology into their teaching methods and curriculum. Additionally, it could influence the relationship between educators, parents, and technology companies as they navigate the balance between leveraging technology for educational purposes and addressing concerns about distractions and potential negative effects on students’ well-being.

fdfbd7efdf4413e61812af22909984f3?s=64&d=mm&r=g Schools Want to Ban Phones. Parents Say No. | The Wall Street Journal
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Miari
23 days ago
Reply to  Cindy

I completely agree. In addition, parents and teachers/administrators will find they have similar issues about cell phone usage but in broader terms parents are responsible for their children 24/7 and contact them for multiple reasons. With issues in today’s society. Those 8-10 or however many hours that a parent can not contact their children can be detrimental.

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stonestreetcoffee.com ☕️ **Discover Stone Street Coffee Company - Your Coffee Haven!** Today's Dough readers, if you're on the hunt for exceptional coffee and cold brew, look no further than Stone Street Coffee Company. We at Today's Dough are smitten with their rich coffee blends and refreshing Cold Brew. Stone Street's commitment to quality shines through in every sip. Now, exclusively for our readers, click the banner above to snag a $5 off coupon on your next order. Experience the finest, ethically sourced beans roasted to perfection. Join the Stone Street community, savor top-notch coffee, and elevate your daily brew. ☕️🌟

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Cindy
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Cindy
23 days ago

The ongoing debate over smartphone usage in schools could have significant implications for the future of education. It may shape the way educators incorporate technology into their teaching methods and curriculum. Additionally, it could influence the relationship between educators, parents, and technology companies as they navigate the balance between leveraging technology for educational purposes and addressing concerns about distractions and potential negative effects on students’ well-being.

Miari
Guest
Miari
23 days ago
Reply to  Cindy

I completely agree. In addition, parents and teachers/administrators will find they have similar issues about cell phone usage but in broader terms parents are responsible for their children 24/7 and contact them for multiple reasons. With issues in today’s society. Those 8-10 or however many hours that a parent can not contact their children can be detrimental.

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